Diversity and Inclusion at UWS

UWS Diversity Committee
UWS Diversity Committee

Mission

University of Western States strives to create a culture of inclusivity that embraces and celebrates the diversity of its faculty, staff and students. Through this, UWS is committed to building a community that reflects the diversity our students will encounter in their professional lives. UWS values a learning environment in which students and employees are empowered through multicultural perspectives that lead to a culturally competent health care workforce, and where employees feel valued and enriched through their differences. UWS is committed to recruiting and retaining employees and students from demographics that are underrepresented in both higher education and health care settings by creating and promoting a welcoming environment that fosters inclusiveness and equal opportunity for all.

Diversity Statement from the President

At University of Western States, the promise of our motto— “for the good of the patient” —is available to everyone. Good health, quality of life and overall well-being are accessible to all individuals, regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, religion or belief, gender identity or expression, disability, age, veteran status or financial background.

As health care providers, educators and students, we share a duty to promote cultural competence in healthcare education, to expand access for integrated healthcare services, and to increase educational and professional development opportunities for students from diverse and underserved communities.

The university mission, to advance the science and art of integrated health care, honors the contributions of all people. The UWS community welcomes a full spectrum of experiences and worldviews, invites open and respectful exchanges of beliefs and ideas, and cultivates unrestricted opportunities for innovation, creativity and synthesis. It is this spirit of exploration, curiosity and inquiry that stimulates new discoveries and novel insights, generates fresh understandings, and energizes the quest for wisdom—all for the good of the patient.

December is…

December 1: World AIDS Day, commemorating those who have died of AIDS, and to acknowledge the need for a continued commitment to all those affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

December 2-10: Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday that is celebrated around the world for eight days and nights. Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the Maccabees or Israelites over the Greek-Syrian ruler, Antiochus about 2200 years ago.

December 2 – 24: Advent, a Christian season of celebration leading up to the birth of Christ.

December 3: International Day of Disabled Persons, designed to raise awareness in regards to persons with disabilities in order to improve their lives and provide them with equal opportunity.

December 8: Bodhi Day, a holiday observed by Buddhists to commemorate Gautama’s enlightenment under the Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya, India.

December 10: International Human Rights Day, established by the United Nations in 1948 to commemorate the anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

December 12: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a religious holiday in Mexico commemorating the appearance of the Virgin Mary near Mexico City in 1531.

December 12: Eid Milad Un Nabi, an Islamic holiday commemorating the birthday of the prophet Muhammad. During this celebration, homes and mosques are decorated, large parades take place, and those observing the holiday participate in charity events.

December 13: St. Lucia’s Day, a religious festival of light in Scandinavia and Italy commemorating the martyrdom of St Lucia, a young Christian girl who was killed for her faith, in 304 AD. She secretly brought food to persecuted Christians in Rome while wearing a wreath of candles on her head so both her hands would be free.

December 16-24: Las Posadas, a nine-day celebration in Mexico commemorating the trials Mary and Joseph endured during their journey to Bethlehem.

December 21: The Winter Solstice/ Yule, celebrated by Pagans and Wiccans, the shortest day of the year represents a celebration focusing on rebirth, renewal, and new beginnings as the sun makes way back to the earth. A solstice is an astronomical event that happens twice each year when the Sun reaches its highest position in the sky.

December 25: Christmas, the day that many Christians associate with Jesus’s birth.

December 26: Boxing Day, a secular holiday celebrated in the UK, Canada Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and South Africa. Also the day of the Feast of Saint Stephen, who is the patron saint of horses.

December 26 – January 1: Kwanzaa, an African-American holiday started by Maulana Karenga in 1966 to celebrate universal African-American heritage.

Organizations

Diversity organizations to check out: