DC Curriculum

Schedule Flexibility

The DC program consists of 12 quarters, which unlike other universities, can be completed in three calendar years. Students also have the option of taking summers off and completing the program in four years, allowing for more schedule flexibility. Many students who choose this option work part-time, study, return home or simply enjoy Portland during this time period.

What to expect?

Wondering what to expect during your time as a student the DC program, aside from the curriculum below? View the DC Program Milestones page to understand what to anticipate each quarter. The learning outcomes below also highlight what knowledge and skills graduates can expect to obtain during the UWS chiropractic program.

Learning Outcomes

The University of Western States Doctor of Chiropractic program prepares its graduates to practice as primary care chiropractic physicians with the following competencies:

  1. Perform appropriate patient assessments and formulate a diagnosis(es.)
  2. Develop, execute and update appropriate case management plans.
  3. Deliver safe, appropriate and effective treatments.
  4. Produce, update and protect accurate patient records and relevant documentation.
  5. Recall and apply knowledge of basic and clinical sciences pertinent to health care.
  6. Demonstrate evidence informed critical thinking and decision making skills resulting in sound clinical reasoning and judgment.
  7. Communicate effectively and appropriately in patient care and professional interactions
  8. Promote health, wellness, safety and disease prevention including public health issues relevant to patients.
  9. Demonstrate ethical conduct and knowledge of the legal responsibilities of a health care provider and clinical practice owner or employee.
  10. Critically access, appraise and apply scientific literature and other health information resources to provide effective patient care and promote intellectual and professional development.
  11. Recognize the evolution of chiropractic and describe its role in integrative health care.

Textbooks

You can buy your textbooks online. Find the DC textbook list here.

Quarter 1

BSC 5102 - Spinal Anatomy 1.5 credits 22 hours

This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human vertebral column. Topics of study include the osteology, arthrology, syndesmology and the neurovascular supply of the spine. A limited number of clinical conditions of the spine are introduced in the lecture material. The occipital, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions of the spine are studied in the laboratory with human bone specimens. The laboratory also includes a number of unique cadaveric prosections that offer an opportunity to study the anatomy of the different vertebral regions.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 5103 - Gross Anatomy I 7 credits 110 hours

In this course, students study the normal regional anatomy of the back, upper extremity and lower extremity. Particular attention is paid to the anatomical relationship of bones, joints, muscles, blood vessels and peripheral nerves in these regions. Introductory anatomical concepts are also included utilizing online learning resources. Lectures emphasize the concepts, terminology, and information needed to appreciate the normal organization of the region under study. Lectures also prepare the student for laboratory dissection of the human cadaver. Students work in small groups during dissection labs to dissect, visualize, and explore the anatomical structures of each region and to observe the individual variations that exist from person to person.

Hours: 4 lecture - 6 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

BSC 5114 - Structural Biochemistry 4.5 credits 55 hours

This course defines and explains the relationship between structure and function of the four biomolecules: amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, and lipids. Students will develop connections between molecular structure and nutrition, physiology, and clinical diagnosis. To explain the biological context of structure, students first review acid-base chemistry and the chemical properties of water and lipids are reviewed. To understand how protein structure dictates function, students identify chemical and structural aspects of a protein that support the general physiology of proteins as well as enzyme catalysis. Next, students study nucleic acids in the context of their role in replication, transcription, and translation. Finally, students will describe carbohydrates and lipids in the context of storage and subcellular structure. This course has an accompanying recitation forum that parallels the lecture material with emphasis on clinical correlates.

Hours: 4 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic

BSC 5116 - Cell Biology 3.5 credits 44 hours

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of normal cellular structure and function. The course is presented in modules framed around ten clinical correlations. Each clinical disorder is presented at the beginning of a module and is then followed by a discussion of the relevant general cellular principles. The module is completed by discussing the specific cell biological basis for the disorder. Four modules are framed around the cell membrane, and other modules deal with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosome, mitochondrion, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. The laboratory sessions consist of an introduction to light microscopy, basic cells and structure, and electron micrographs of the lecture material.

Hours: 3 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CHR 5122 - Introduction to Health Care 3 credits 3 hours

This course explores the origins and evolution of health services in society- starting with professions & practitioners, payers, politics and patients have experienced in health care over time. Through this exploration the student will gain knowledge of how health care has been shaped into today’s iteration of the industry and what the course of history has taught society about health services delivery’s role in society. A specific focus and depth of exploration will be committed to chiropractic’s chapter in this process and the student as a practitioner in the health care industry. Roles, expectations, duties, opportunities and liabilities will be explored. The successful student will emerge from this course well triangulated to the industry they are training to enter and their place in that industry. Last, a brief glimpse into the future of health care will be undertaken, with emphasis on chiropractic’s potential role(s).

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 5137 - Surface Anatomy 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course introduces the student to the fundamental examination skills of observation and palpation and instructs the student in the identification of normal bony and soft tissue landmarks of the spine and extremities.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 5183 - Spine and Pelvis Radiographic Anatomy 2.25 credits 33 hours

Since plain film radiography is widely used in chiropractic practice, identification of key spinal and contiguous spinal structures seen on plain film radiography is the emphasis of this course. Basic anatomy of the spinal regions seen on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is also studied. Lectures demonstrate the most important structures to identify on various imaging modalities. Lab sessions provide supervised radiograph and slide viewing with an opportunity to interact with the instructors.

Hours: 1.5 lecture - 1.5 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 5216 - Spinal Biomechanics 1 credits 1 hours

This course introduces the student to biomechanical and kinesiologic terms and concepts necessary for the development of observational and palpatory skills of the spine and extremities.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

Quarter 2

BSC 5203 - Gross Anatomy II 5.5 credits 77 hours

This course highlights the regional anatomy of the head and anterolateral neck. In lectures and dissection labs students learn the detailed anatomy of the muscles, nerves, bones, joints, blood vessels, organs of special sense and visceral structures of the region. The structural and functional features of the cranial nerves, the organization of the autonomic nervous system, and the innervation of the spine and paraspinal tissue are also presented. In lab all students will dissect human cadavers and study the anatomical variation in structures associated with the deep and superficial neck and head, including the cranial vault, oral and nasal cavities, pharynx and larynx.

Hours: 4 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 5215 - Intermediary Metabolism 4.5 credits 55 hours

This course describes the process by which nutritive material is converted into cellular components. Students will identify each enzyme, cofactor, and chemical intermediate, and explain key regulation points in each metabolic pathway. Further, students will assess how defects in vitamins or enzymes influence each process. Topics in carbohydrate metabolism include glucose uptake from blood to cell, glycolysis, aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, the pentose shunt, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism. Lipid metabolism topics include the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids, ketone body formation, fatty acid synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, cholesterol synthesis, and lipid transport. For amino acid metabolism, topics include urea synthesis, catabolism of amino acid carbon skeletons, and synthesis of non-essential amino acids. Topics in nucleotide metabolism are focused on the biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, and deoxynucleotides, as well as purine catabolism and pathogenesis of gout. As a final topic, vitamins are discussed in terms of general function, coenzyme forms, and deficiency. This course has an accompanying recitation forum that parallels the lecture material with emphasis on disorders of metabolism.

Hours: 4 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

BSC 5217 - Histology 5 credits 66 hours

In this course students will learn the microscopic anatomy of the following organ systems: integumentary, musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous, digestive, respiratory, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive. Intervertebral and synovial joint histology is covered. Students learn the structure, function, and location of each of the four basic tissue types (epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, nervous tissue) and how they each contribute to organ structure and function. Microscopic morphology, composition, organization, and resultant function are emphasized. In the associated labs students learn proper technique for using a microscope and thoroughly examine commercially prepared histological specimens from all relevant tissues and organs.

Hours: 4 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CHR 5223 - Exploring the Chiropractic Profession 1 credits 11 hours

This course explores the range and types of chiropractic practice options. Topics include the spectrum of chiropractic examination and treatment procedures, professional practice options, the safety and public perception of chiropractic, and the profession’s political and educational organizations, responsibilities, and agendas.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 5227 - Spinal Kinetics and Kinematics 2 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to the study of the functional anatomy and kinematics of the spine. Other topics presented include an introduction to the biomechanics of gait, an introduction to treatment principles, and a discussion of cavitation principles.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 5231 - Adjustive Psychomotor Skills 1 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to developing the foundation of body mechanics and spinal adjusting psychomotor skills that are central to the safe delivery of adjustive therapy. The course focuses on instruction in adjustive body mechanics, spinal and extremity muscle stretching and endurance training, proprioceptive training and adjustive pre-tension, and adjustive thrust (impulse) drills.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 5235 - Spinal Assessment 2 credits 44 hours

This course instructs the student in the physical assessment of spinal joint structure and function. Joint assessment procedures of static palpation, motion palpation, end feel, joint play, postural assessment, and range of motion assessment are presented.

Hours: 0 lecture - 4 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 5244 - Information Mastery 1 credits 11 hours

This course is designed to develop the search skills necessary to efficiently access health care literature and resources. Efficient search skills are a prerequisite to subsequent EIP courses and a skill that will be accessed frequently throughout the chiropractic program both in the classroom and during patient care.

 

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 5284 - Extremity Radiographic Anatomy 1.5 credits 22 hours

The identification of structures of the upper and lower extremities seen on plain film radiography is the emphasis of this course; the cranium is also reviewed. Basic anatomy of the upper and lower extremities and the cranium seen on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is also studied. Lectures demonstrate the most important structures to identify on various imaging modalities. Lab sessions provide supervised radiograph and slide viewing with an opportunity to interact with the instructors.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

Quarter 3

BSC 5302 - Neuroanatomy 7 credits 88 hours

This course describes the detailed anatomy and functional features of macro- and micro-anatomical structures in the brain and spinal cord. In this course, students first learn the basic structural and organizational features of the spinal cord and brain. Students then consider the interactions of spinal cord and brain structures that comprise major sensory and motor functional pathway systems. In lecture and in lab, course material includes discussion of neurological deficits associated with disturbances of brain and spinal cord structures. In the lab, students study whole and dissected human brain specimens and stained sections of the human brainstem and spinal cord that display normal and diseased structure.

Hours: 6 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 5304 - Gross Anatomy III 5.5 credits 77 hours

In this course, students study the normal regional anatomy of the thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum, including discussions of the heart, lungs, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Particular attention is paid to the terminology, position, and relationship of these organs to each other in the body cavity, as well as their blood supply and innervation by the autonomic nervous system. The anatomical and clinical relationships of the bones, joints, muscles, blood vessels, and peripheral nerves of the body wall are also discussed. Each organ system includes special emphasis on the anatomy of referred pain, an important consideration in the field of chiropractic. The laboratory portion of this course continues the unique opportunity to dissect, visualize, and explore each of the four regions under study.

Hours: 4 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 5309 - Physiology I 5 credits 66 hours

This course addresses cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology. Approximately 60 percent of the course consists of cardiovascular concepts including blood, hemodynamics, cardiac cycle, electrocardiography, blood pressure, central nervous control, peripheral vasculature, systemic circulation, capillary dynamics and the lymphatic system. Approximately 20 percent of the course consists of respiratory concepts including ventilation, gas exchange, gas transport, and the control of respiration. The remaining 20 percent of the course covers renal concepts including glomerular filtration, tubular exchange mechanics, urine formation, body fluid balance and micturition. Relevant pathological concepts are presented whenever possible. The weekly laboratory sessions consist of observations and experiments on humans; some activities include the use of digital physiological recording equipment to explore the cardiac cycle and the electrocardiogram. Additionally, the lab portion of the course serves as an introduction to the clinical skills of heart auscultation and arterial blood pressure measurement.

Hours: 4 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 5314 - Human Development 3 credits 33 hours

This lecture course explores the complex phenomena of human development. Emphasis is on the embryonic period (weeks 1-8) of development. The processes of gametogenesis, fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, placentation, segmentation and organogenesis are all discussed. The course provides an understanding of the development of adult body structures in relation to each other. Some general topics of interest include mechanisms for twin formation, heart and limb formation, gender determination, and influences affecting cellular differentiation. Detailed terminology regarding developmental processes and the timing of developmental stages are introduced. Discussions include congenital abnormalities and the factors that disrupt normal development.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CHR 5322 - Thoracic Manipulation Lecture 2 credits 22 hours

This course is designed to provide the student with an anatomical, biomechanical, and pathophysiologic basis for chiropractic adjustive therapy. It is structured to reinforce methods covered in adjustive technique lab sessions. Topics will include definition and classification of manual therapies, adjustive technique terminology, general and specific thoracic adjusting mechanics, adjusting contraindications/complications, adjustive therapy decision analysis, and adjustive treatment guidelines.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 5325 - Chiropractic Theories 1 credits 11 hours

This course focuses on the theories of spinal motion segment dysfunction/subluxation. Topics include philosophy and its relationship to chiropractic theory and practice, the concept of the manipulable lesion, definitions, prevalence, diagnosis, theoretic etiology, pathophysiology and health effects of spinal subluxation/dysfunction syndromes, and theoretic effects and mechanisms of adjustive therapy.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 5333 - Thoracic Manipulation Lab 2 credits 44 hours

This course is devoted to developing foundation adjustive skills and the development of the knowledge, physical exam, and psychomotor skills necessary to provide effective chiropractic adjustments of the spine, with a focus on the thoracic spine. Adjustive techniques include prone, supine, sitting and standing procedures.

Hours: 0 lecture - 4 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 5385 - Soft Tissue Normal Imaging 1.5 credits 22 hours

Identification of soft tissue structures of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis seen on plain film radiography is the emphasis of this course. Basic anatomy of these regions seen on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is also studied. Lab sessions provide supervised radiograph and slide viewing with an opportunity to interact with the instructors.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

Quarter 4

BSC 6103 - Neurophysiology 5 credits

This is a limited scope neuroscience course in three parts (modules). The first module contains a cellular and molecular neuroscience component, which includes coverage of the cellular components of the nervous system, synaptic transmission, molecular signaling within neurons, neurotransmitters and receptors, cellular electrophysiology, neuronal damage and regeneration, excitotoxicity, and synaptic plasticity processes, among others. Topical areas in cellular/molecular neuroscience are presented that complement presentations of systems neuroscience (module 2). The second module covers cognitive neuroscience topics including a systems neuroscience component. A select set of clinically relevant cognitive neuroscience topics are covered, including distributed functions of neural/cognitive networks underlying perception, sleep, attention, emotion, memory, and global brain states. The third module is dedicated to the neurophysiology of pain, including but not limited to: nociceptors, transduction of nociceptive signals, nociceptive pathways, and mechanisms of pain modulation. Throughout the course relevant clinical conditions are presented.

Hours: 5 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic

BSC 6109 - Physiology II 5 credits 55 hours

This course defines and explains the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems, as well as hypothalamic regulation of metabolism and temperature. For each topic, the student will identify the purpose of each gland, organ, hormone, or neurologic stimulus. Further, students will analyze each system in response to endocrine deficiency, excess, or mis-regulation. Hormones from the pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, pancreas, and gonads, as well as those associated with calcium regulation, are studied. For each endocrine category the student will study the pertinent anatomy and histology, general chemical structure of hormones, hormone biosynthesis, actions of hormones, mechanism of action at target sites, and regulation of secretion. Gastrointestinal physiology topics include neural and hormonal regulation in the gut, behavior of smooth muscle, motility, secretions, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Metabolic physiology topics include measurement of metabolic rate, factors affecting basal metabolic rate, contributions to calorie expenditure, and regulatory mechanisms associated with food intake. Temperature regulation topics include hypothalamic control of heat gain and heat loss mechanisms.

Hours: 5 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 6112 - Microbiology, Immunology and Public Health 5.5 credits 66 hours

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of microbiology and public health. Structure, metabolism, genetics, and antibiotic therapy of prokaryotic microorganisms is presented. Students develop a practical understanding of the importance of pathogenic bacteria in clinical practice and public health. Lectures cover topics including the causative agents of meningitis, streptococcal sore throat, pneumonia, anaerobic infections, diphtheria, tetanus and enteric infections. Laboratory exercises include cultivation and diagnostic procedures using live bacteria. There is a comprehensive introduction to the principles of immunology, including development of the immune system, immune injury, and the use of immunization in prevention of infectious diseases. The public health component of the course addresses the basic principles of public health, disease prevention, epidemiology and international health. Students are asked to find and assess literature concerning public health issues. This exercise reinforces the principles of evidence based practice. The role of the Chiropractic Health Section of the American Public Health Association and its significance to the chiropractic profession is discussed.

Hours: 5 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 6118 - Fundamental Pathology 6 credits

This course provides the student with an understanding of the key concepts and major themes of pathology (the study of disease), integrate these concepts with prior knowledge of anatomy and physiology, and prepare the student for the clinical phase of the chiropractic curriculum. The emphasis in this course is on the characteristics of cellular, tissue, and organ responses in disease. Topics of study include the gross and histological features of cell injury and necrosis, a review of metabolic, environmental, and degenerative conditions leading to tissue deposits of various substances, and the cellular and chemical features of acute and chronic inflammation. Characteristics of tissue regeneration and wound healing are reviewed. The etiology, pathogenesis, morphology, and functional aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms are examined. Disturbances of circulation including edema, hemorrhage, thrombosis, embolization, and infarction are described. Disorders of the immune system are surveyed including hypersensitivity reactions, autoimmune disease and immunological deficiencies. Diseases of bone, joints, and muscle and major conditions affecting the organ systems are also reviewed. Topics include osteoporosis and osteomalacia, osteomyelitis and skeletal neoplasms. Structural and clinical features of arthritis (including osteo- and rheumatoid types) and diseases of muscle including the dystrophies and myasthenia gravis are described

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic

CHR 6125 - Rehabilitation Principles 2 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the basic principles of designing rehabilitation programs to treat the soft tissue structures of the body. Lecture presents evidence-based rationale for each of the treatments presented. Laboratory topics include trigger point therapy, instrument-assisted soft tissue manipulation, muscle stretching techniques and lumbar stabilization protocols.

Hours: 1 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6126 - Pelvic Manipulation Lecture 1 credits 11 hours

This course is devoted to the examination and treatment of pelvic manipulative disorders. It is designed to provide the student with an anatomical, biomechanical, and physiologic basis for the evaluation and adjustive management of pelvic subluxation/dysfunction syndromes.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6127 - Pelvic Manipulation Lab 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the development of the psychomotor skills necessary for examination and adjustive treatment of pelvic dysfunction. Adjustive techniques include side posture, prone, and drop table procedures. Pubic symphysis adjustments and pelvic blocking techniques are also presented. Additional time is scheduled to review and reinforce examination and adjusting psychomotor skills of the thoracic spine.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 6145 - History Taking and Communication Skills 1.5 credits 22 hours

The purpose of the course is to teach students to take and appropriately chart a comprehensive patient history. Students will learn the introductory, basic legal requirements for charting, listening skills and strategies, interviewing skills and strategies, general clinical decision making strategies, chief complaint, past health, family health, and personal and social history taking skills, as well as review of systems. The lab portion for this course allows students to practice listening/communication skills, history taking skills and properly documenting a comprehensive patient history. By the end of the course, students will be able to take and correctly chart from memory a comprehensive patient history.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 6179 - Evaluating Therapy Studies 2 credits 22 hours

This course focuses on the critical appraisal of randomized controlled trials. Hands-on practice and application of key concepts will be used to encourage effective problem-solving strategies and future application of evidence-informed practice (EIP) in the clinical experience.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 6187 - Radiation Physics and Safety 2 credits 33 hours

Since a large percentage of chiropractic physicians own and operate radiographic equipment in their offices, the skills acquired in these classes are essential for proper use and application within their clinical practices. This course emphasizes radiation physics, x-ray production, radiobiology, radiation safety, exposure principles, and image production/processing. Students learn to assess film quality and begin to understand imaging procedures that augment plain film imaging technology.

Hours: 2 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

Quarter 5

BSC 6203 - Nutrition 4 credits 44 hours

IIn this course the student applies basic biochemical and physiological knowledge to understand the principles of nutritional science and to develop an appreciation of nutrition’s role in preventive and therapeutic health care. In reviewing the health issues surrounding each macronutrient and micronutrient, the student learns to assess dietary and other risk factors for diseases that may be preventable through nutritional intervention. Selected clinical applications in therapeutic nutrition are used to illustrate important concepts and to introduce the student to the practice of clinical nutrition. Term projects include practical experience in diet assessment and practice in locating and evaluating nutrition research from an evidence-based perspective.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 6207 - Genetics 4 credits 44 hours

This course describes the process of inheritance or acquisition of traits. Students will learn how the central dogma and the process of meiosis support Mendelian and non-Mendelian transmission of traits portrayed in pedigree and karyotype analysis. Next, students will learn how environment, gene dosage, and gene expression contribute to the heritability of a trait in a population. Students will identify how gross and microscopic chromosome abnormalities of autosomes and sex chromosomes influence heritable traits, and further, how epigenetic changes modify the expression of traits over a lifetime. Students will also learn how biotechnology techniques enhance the study of the expression of traits. Students will apply their understanding of the transmission and acquisition of traits to genetic disorders of metabolism, cancer, immunity and behavior. This course includes evaluation of clinical scenarios to emphasize each topic and highlight disorders that chiropractors commonly encounter.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 6213 - Clinical Microbiology and Public Health 6 credits 77 hours

This course is a comprehensive review of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. Emphasis is on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Bacterial diseases include pertussis, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), Lyme disease, tuberculosis, leprosy, typhus and legionnaire’s disease. Medical mycology is explored with emphasis on fungal diseases such as dermatophytoses. The section on parasites includes amoebae, malaria, round worms, and tapeworms. The final section of the course is a comprehensive review of viral diseases, including smallpox, herpes, polio, influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis, rabies and HIV. The laboratory includes bacteriological staining exercises, examination of parasites, and cultivation of fungi. Important public health aspects, including immunizations, are discussed whenever relevant.

Hours: 5 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

BSC 6219 - Systems Pathology 4 credits 4 hours

This course emphasizes diseases of the organ systems. Major diseases of the cardiovascular and hematopoietic organs, such as arteriosclerosis, aneurysms, ischemic heart disease, anemia, lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma, are discussed. Diseases of the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas are discussed along with pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, including ulcers, neoplasms, and inflammatory conditions. A number of diseases affecting the nervous system including senile dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and peripheral neuropathies are explored. Conditions affecting the respiratory system, such as bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma are discussed. A variety of diseases involving the kidney and urinary tract as well as a host of pathologies of both male and female reproductive structures are presented. Diagnostic imaging and multiple case studies are presented throughout the course and there is an increasing emphasis on developing an attitude and frame of mind conducive to success in the clinical phase of the chiropractic curriculum.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6225 - Lumbar Manipulation Lecture 1 credits 11 hours

This course is devoted to the examination and treatment of lumbar manipulative disorders. The course provides an anatomical, biomechanical, and pathophysiologic basis for chiropractic manipulative therapy of the lumbar spine. It is designed to complement presentations covered in lumbar technique laboratory sessions. Topics include functional anatomy, biomechanics, evaluation, terminology, adjustive mechanics, complications/contraindications, and adjustive therapy guidelines and decision-making relative to the lumbar spine.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6226 - Joint Dysfunction and Pain Syndromes 1 credits 11 hours

This course focuses on various neurological models for spinal joint dysfunction and manipulation. A variety of mechanisms are presented related to the instigation of local and radiating pain, adverse neurological effects in the musculoskeletal system as well as the controversy regarding clinically significant visceral effects.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6228 - Tissue Biomechanics 2 credits 22 hours

This course covers the biomechanical properties of muscles, nerves, and connective tissue and tissue injury and repair. Topics include stress-strain curves, length-tension relationships, hysteresis, types of loads and forces, and the response of various types of tissue. Additional emphasis is placed on the pathobiomechanics of low back and whiplash injuries.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

6235 - Lumbar Manipulation Lab 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the examination and treatment of lumbar subluxation/dysfunction syndromes. The laboratory sessions are devoted to the development of the knowledge, physical exam, and psychomotor skills necessary for effective chiropractic adjustments of the lumbar spine. Adjustive techniques include side posture, prone, and drop table procedures. Additional time is scheduled to review and reinforce examination and adjusting psychomotor skills of the pelvis and thoracic spine.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 6250 - Head and Neck Diagnosis and Management 3 credits 33 hours

The course includes assessment and evaluation of the visual system, the components and clinical application of the neurological exam, and the evaluation of the dizzy or vertiginous patient. Emphasis is placed on integration of knowledge previously acquired in the basic sciences curriculum, the need to critically assess the patient’s history and risk factors, the correlation between pathophysiologic changes and resultant clinical findings, the significance of these findings, and the prioritization of the patient’s health care needs.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CED 6251 - Head and Neck Physical Assesment 1 credits 22 hours

Students learn and demonstrate proficiency in performing routine examination of the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, throat, sinuses, the cranial nerves, and specific tests for assessing dizziness. Additionally, students learn to appropriately perform the following treatment procedures: ear irrigation, nasal specific, endonasal, Argyrol sinus treatment, and Epley’s maneuver.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 6275 - Dermatology and Infectious Disease 2 credits 22 hours

This course is an introduction to common skin disorders frequently encountered in a chiropractic office. The structure, function, and immune reactions of skin are reviewed. Students acquire basic information necessary for differential diagnosis and treatment of common skin diseases. Benign, pre-malignant, and malignant tumors are covered, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Other topics include vascular lesions, birthmarks, and inherited diseases such as psoriasis and pemphigus. Differential diagnosis of eczema and dermatitis comprise a major portion of this course. Other common conditions include acne, bacterial and superficial fungal infections, connective tissue disease, and nail disorders. Students learn to provide conservative treatment and counseling to patients with a variety of skin diseases.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 6278 - Evaluating Diagnosis Studies 2 credits 22 hours

This course focuses on the critical appraisal of systematic reviews, diagnostic studies and prognosis studies. Hands-on practice and application of key concepts will be used to encourage effective problem-solving strategies and future application of evidence-informed practice in the clinical experience.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CED 7307 - Imaging Clinical Decision Making 3 credits 44 hours

This course asks students to apply best practices evidence in the justification and acquisition of diagnostic imaging on conditions encountered in practice. Clinical cases will be used as a basis to explore when and what diagnostic imaging studies yield the most appropriate outcomes. Successful students will choose the most appropriate imaging studies, justifying their choices and demonstrating ability to predict findings on various imaging studies.

Hours: 2 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

Quarter 6

CHR 6326 - Spinal Disorders: Diagnosis and Management 6 credits 66 hours

This course introduces the diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge necessary for the management of lesions, defects, or disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system. Discussion of mechanical, congenital, or traumatic and neuromusculoskeletal disorders affecting the spine and its adjacent soft tissue are emphasized.

Hours: 6 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6327 - Neuro-Orthopedic Assessment of the Spine 1 credits 22 hours

This course introduces the diagnostic and therapeutic skills necessary for the management of lesions, defects, or disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system. The skills of examination and management of mechanical, congenital, or traumatic and neuromusculoskeletal disorders affecting the spine and its adjacent soft tissue are emphasized.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6332 - Extremity Biomechanics 2 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to the study of functional anatomy, kinematics and biomechanics of the upper and lower extremities. Topics include joint structure, principles of joint movement, gait, and a joint-by-joint evaluation.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6333 - Extremity Muscle Testing 1 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to the study of functional anatomy and kinematics of the extremities. Laboratory sessions instruct the student in the examination of the extremities with special emphasis on neuromusculoskeletal evaluation and measurement.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6338 - Cervical Manipulation Lecture 1 credits 11 hours

This course focuses on topics in cervical spinal adjustive technique. The course provides an anatomical, biomechanical, and pathophysiological basis for cervical and thoraco-cervical manipulative therapy. It is meant to complement presentations covered in cervical adjustive technique laboratory sessions. Topics include biomechanics, selected conditions and treatment, spinal manipulation and vertebrobasilar complications, evaluation, and adjustive mechanics.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 6339 - Cervical Manipulation Lab 2.5 credits 55 hours

This course is devoted to the development of adjustive technique skills as applied to the cervical spine. It provides the opportunity for the practical application of palpation, examination, identification of dysfunction, and treatment of the occiput, cervical, and thoraco-cervical spine. Adjustive techniques are presented in the supine, prone, and sitting patient positions, along with selected drop table procedures.

Hours: 0 lecture - 5 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6340 - Extremity Joint Play Assessment 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the development of the knowledge, physical exam, and psychomotor palpation skills necessary for effective chiropractic joint play evaluation of the upper and lower extremities.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 6341 - Spinal Rehabilitation 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the evaluation and treatment of spinal soft tissue structures/injuries. Topics include lumbar stabilization protocols, pain centralization protocols (based on McKenzie), muscle energy techniques, joint mobilization, distraction/decompression protocols (based on Cox), key movement patterns and sensory motor training.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 6345 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnosis and Management 4 credits 44 hours

The course includes assessment and evaluation of the vascular system, thorax, lungs, abdomen, lymphatic system, thyroid gland, and ears. Emphasis is placed on the need to critically assess the patient’s history and risk factors, the correlation between pathophysiologic changes and resultant clinical findings, the significance of these findings, and the prioritization of the patient’s health care needs.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CED 6346 - Thorax and Abdomen Physical Assessment 1 credits 22 hours

Laboratory sessions provide instruction in the performance of various protocols and procedures associated with a routine physical examination. Students learn and demonstrate proficiency in the use of the stethoscope and sphygmomanometer in the evaluation of the vital signs, the arterial system, and the lungs and heart exam. Students also learn and demonstrate proficiency in the abdominal exam and the examination of the lymphatic system and thyroid gland.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 6367 - Clinical Laboratory 4 credits 55 hours

This course introduces clinical laboratory procedures, including hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, and serology. Students learn the appropriate use of clinical laboratory tests as screening and/or diagnostic tools and the differences between and significance of “normal” and “abnormal” laboratory values. Students learn to understand the importance of the sensitivity and specificity of various laboratory tests in explaining why a particular laboratory value falls outside the normal reference range. In the corresponding laboratory sessions, students learn “universal precautions,” risks associated with exposure to blood borne pathogens, and proper procedures for collecting blood and other specimens, and perform simple laboratory procedures that can be utilized as in-office tests.

Hours: 3 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CED 6370 - Patient Management and Charting 1 credits 11 hours

This course introduces students to topics related to routine patient care and introduction to the requirements of patient charting. Learning exercises emphasize development of patient management plans, clinical thinking relating to charting and the documentation of patient evaluation, diagnosis, management and treatment.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

Quarter 7

CHR 7128 - Lower Extremity Diagnosis and Management 3 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the diagnosis and management of common lower extremity conditions, which may be mechanical, congenital, degenerative, or traumatic in nature.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 7129 - Lower Extremity Orthopedic Assessment 1 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to the development of the skills of examination, diagnosis, and management of lower extremity conditions, which may be mechanical, congenital, degenerative, or traumatic in nature.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7130 - Lower Extremity Taping and Splinting .5 credits 11 hours

This is a practical hands-on laboratory course intended to provide the chiropractic student with the basic knowledge and skills to appropriately select and apply necessary support and protection with athletic tape, elastic wraps, plaster splints, and OTC braces when treating common neuromusculoskeletal injuries and other common conditions of the lower extremity.

Hours: 0 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7139 - Extremity Joint Manipulation 1 credits 22 hours

This course is devoted to the development of the knowledge, physical exam, and psychomotor adjustive skills necessary for effective chiropractic adjustments of upper and lower extremities.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7140 - Spinal Manipulation Review 1.5 credits 33 hours

This course is designed to integrate and reinforce biomechanical assessment and adjustive technique skills covered in previous adjustive technique courses.

Hours: 0 lecture - 3 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 7160 - Intern Development 2 credits 33 hours

The report writing portion of the course will be exclusively to provide a bridge between the didactic and clinical courses. Students learn and practice with the current electronic health records system used by all UWS clinics and learn how clinical procedures are conducted through observations in the clinic system. The report writing portion of the course is online and will focuses on correspondence a chiropractic physician would be expected to produce in practice including progress reports, referral letters to colleagues and specialists, patient discharge letters and case summaries.

Hours: 1 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 7161 - Clinical Training – Phase I 3 credits 44 hours

The purpose of the course is to support the knowledge and skills required to deliver care in the clinical internship. The first half of the lecture portion is designed to review effective history taking and physical examination procedures as they apply to working up a musculoskeletal complaint during a new patient visit. Students are introduced to basic clinic documentation and the processes of working through a differential diagnosis, management plan, and prognosis. The second half of the lecture portion introduces clinical reasoning strategies for diagnosing and assessing musculoskeletal conditions as well as building evidenced-informed practice and critical thinking skills. Utilizing standardized patients, the lab portion is designed to promote the student’s ability to apply examination skills from previous courses; begin to demonstrate proficiency in performing complete regional cervical, lumbar and general physical exam flows; and to synthesize clinical data into a working diagnosis and coherent management plan.

Hours: 2 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7163 - Physiotherapy Modalities 3 credits 44 hours

This course introduces students to the adjunctive physiological therapeutic modalities available to the chiropractic physician. These modalities employ the use of heat, cold, water, electricity, light, and traction. The basic physics and physiological principles governing each modality are discussed, as well as indications, contraindications, and rationales for their application. The corresponding hands-on lab training develops proficiency in applying these modalities.

Hours: 2 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CED 7164 - Gastrointestinal Diagnosis and Management 3 credits 33 hours

Common gastroenteric pathologies, their etiologies, symptomatology, and associated risk factors are covered. Students learn the signs, symptoms, and clinical manifestations associated with abnormal changes in gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. Emphasis is placed on the incidence, prevalence, etiology, natural history, progression, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of selected conditions. Case management of those conditions amenable to conservative care is discussed, as are the indications for appropriate referral. Previously acquired knowledge of anatomy, physiology, public health parameters, history, physical exam findings, laboratory and radiologic evaluation, clinical decision-making, and clinical nutrition is integrated.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7167 - Clinical Pathology 3 credits 33 hours

In this sequel to CSC 6367 Clinical Laboratory, students learn to synthesize clinical data in reaching a diagnostic conclusion. Students utilize detailed knowledge of common clinical laboratory procedures to diagnose, confirm clinical impressions, screen for disease, estimate prognosis, evaluate therapeutic progress, and relate laboratory findings to pathophysiological processes. They identify appropriate laboratory procedures for specific clinical situations and determine when an abnormal laboratory result is clinically significant. Students determine a differential diagnosis based upon laboratory findings in conjunction with associated historical facts and physical findings. Students must demonstrate knowledge of specific diseases/disorders, including etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical and radiological features, routine and special laboratory findings, current therapeutic approaches, and appropriate referral protocols when indicated.

 

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7175 - Emergency Care 1 credits 11 hours

This course prepares chiropractors to respond to traumatic injuries and sudden severe illness in non-clinical settings. Each student is instructed and examined in basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation for certification through the American Heart Association. Good Samaritan Laws, consciousness assessment, poisoning, cardiac emergencies, near drowning, burns, etc. are covered.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: p/f

CSC 7177 - Transitioning Into Practice 1 credits 11 hours

As students approach graduation, the specter of actually going into practice looms. This course explores the variety of possible entry points into practice, identifying benefits, liabilities, areas of potential trouble of all. This course will also describe the landscape of how to evaluate the quality of any of the possible entry points into practice, be it associateship as an employee or independent contractor or as a practice owner via buy-out of an existing practice or starting de novo. Examples of good and bad employment agreements, leases, practice valuation assessments and other details will be discussed. This course will ensure an informed decision when considering a particular starting point into practice.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7188 - X-ray Positioning – Spine and Thorax 1.5 credits 22 hours

Proper anatomical positioning is presented. Imaging of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal regions is emphasized. Positioning for chest and bony thorax is also covered. Principles of physics used in radiography are reviewed and discussed. The student will demonstrate skill in radiographic positioning technique and patient protection from ionizing radiation in the performance of mock radiographic exams.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

RAD 7192 - Bone Pathology I 2.5 credits 33 hours

This is the first in a series of five courses covering the clinical application of diagnostic imaging modalities and interpretation. Knowledge and reasoning skills necessary for accurate interpretation and selection of diagnostic imaging modalities within clinical practice are emphasized in this series (see RAD 7293, RAD 7394, RAD 8199, and RAD 8295). Bone Pathology I is an introduction to a systematic approach to the radiographic interpretation and case management of normal variants, congenital anomalies, common miscellaneous acquired conditions, fractures, and dislocations.

Hours: 2 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

Quarter 8

CLI 7210 - Clinical Internship I 2 credits 66 hours

The clinical internship course series provides students with increasing opportunities to apply, integrate, and refine the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become confident, competent, and caring primary care chiropractic physicians. Occurring within a clinic setting, interns incorporate evidence-informed clinical reasoning in applying effective health care procedures and professional integrity in the delivery of patient-centered care. Interns are mentored and supervised by attending physicians who facilitate patient care and clinical education while ensuring quality patient care. At this early point in the clinical internship course series, interns are closely supervised by attending physicians and limited to active involvement in less complicated cases. Upon initiation of this course, students complete a clinical entrance assessment, consisting of patient evaluation and management skills, to verify level of readiness for involvement in patient care.

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 6 clinic
Grading: P/F

CED 7210 - Clinical Training – Phase II 3 credits 44 hours

The overall goals of this course include increasing expertise in the realm of targeted exam skills, improving speed and efficiency in doing a clinical work up of a regional complaint (with a special emphasis on the spine), and improving overall clinical decision making. Additionally, there is special focus on clinical problem solving, increasing the breadth and depth of knowledge regarding selected spinal conditions and synthesizing pre-appraised literature for a clinical problem. Utilizing simulated patients, the lab portion is designed to promote the student’s ability to perform a variety of regional exams and synthesize clues from the history, physical, and ancillary studies into a diagnosis and management plan. Areas of emphasis include EENT, heart/lung, abdominal and thoracic exams. The complete regional cervical and lumbar exam flows are revisited in addition to the introduction of the “focused” examination.

Hours: 2 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7230 - Upper Extremity Diagnosis and Management 3 credits 33 hours

This course is devoted to the diagnosis and management of common upper extremity conditions, which may be mechanical, congenital, degenerative, or traumatic in nature.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 7231 - Upper Extremity Orthopedic Assessment 1 credits 11 hours

This course is devoted to the development of the skills of examination, diagnosis, and management of upper extremity conditions, which may be mechanical, congenital, degenerative, or traumatic in nature.

Hours: 0 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7232 - Upper Extremity Taping and Splinting .5 credits 11 hours

This is a practical hands-on laboratory course intended to provide the chiropractic student with the basic knowledge and skills to appropriately select and apply necessary support and protection with athletic tape, elastic wraps, plaster splints, and OTC braces when treating musculoskeletal injuries and other common conditions of the upper extremity.

Hours: 0 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7233 - Extremity Manipulation Review 1 credits 22 hours

This course reviews chiropractic extremity manipulative procedures that are commonly utilized in practice. Instruction centers around common clinical scenarios where extremity manipulation is indicated. Relevant research evidence is referenced when available. Individualized variation of foundational manipulative techniques is reviewed and encouraged.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 7266 - Advanced Rehabilitation 3 credits 44 hours

The emphasis of this course is on assessment strategies and treatment concepts fundamental to chiropractic patient management of the locomotor system. A biopsychosocial model is presented in an effort to highlight the importance of patient participation with both passive and active care modalities to improve outcomes in a manual therapy setting. The student will learn to use a variety of assessment strategies to create an individualized treatment plan that addresses key features of common functional and structural neuromusculoskeletal disorders.

Hours: 2 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7268 - Doctor/Patient Communication 1.5 credits 22 hours

This course explores development of doctor/patient trust and cooperation as achieved in initial conversations and interactions. It clarifies the legal and fiduciary requirements of the physician as well as identifying strategies and priorities in communication with patients under a variety of situations that realistically happen in practice. Students will conduct report of findings, PARQ conference and informed consent procedures using best practices approaches. Students will also learn a strategy to deliver difficult news such as a cancer diagnosis or other serious health problem to patients. Last, this course provides counsel and advice to student-physicians on how to screen for and evaluate difficult circumstances such as intimate partner violence, substance abuse, diversity issues and sexual boundary violations. Successful students will be equipped to better evaluate and resonate with patients in ways that facilitate satisfaction and compliance with care.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7271 - Clinical Nutrition and Botanicals I 4 credits 44 hours

This course helps the student understand the role of diet modification and nutritional and botanical supplementation in the management of commonly encountered health disorders. The course begins by introducing the science underlying the use of botanical therapies and reviewing several basic therapeutic programs that use diet and lifestyle changes as well as supplementation with micronutrients, botanicals, or nutraceuticals. Subsequently, a body systems approach is used to present specific nutritional therapies for a variety of cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, psychoneurological, respiratory, and endocrine/metabolic disorders, including nutritional anemias. Additionally, cancer prevention and sports nutrition will be addressed. Discussions revolve around issues and controversies in current nutritional science. Assignments allow students to practice diet assessment, diet prescription, and the use of electronic resources for investigating scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of nutritional and botanical interventions.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 7289 - X-ray Positioning – Extremities and Pelvis 1.5 credits 22 hours

This course covers the proper anatomical positioning required to demonstrate the upper and lower extremities and pelvis. Positioning for plain film abdomen radiography is also covered. The student will demonstrate skill in radiographic positioning, technique, and patient protection from radiation in the performance of exams of the upper and lower extremities and pelvis. Students will perform mock radiographic exams on their peers.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

RAD 7293 - Bone Pathology II 3.5 credits 44 hours

This is the second in the series of courses covering the clinical application of diagnostic imaging modalities and interpretation (see RAD 7192, RAD 7394, RAD 8199, and RAD 8295). Students are introduced to the radiologic, laboratory, and clinical manifestations of the more common neoplasms, infections, and arthritides. Appropriate management and/or patient referral for each disease are discussed. Various visual media are used in presenting course material.

Hours: 3 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

Quarter 9

CLI 7307 - Clinical Internship II 3.25 credits 110 hours

The clinical internship course series provides students with increasing opportunities to apply, integrate, and refine the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become confident, competent, and caring primary care chiropractic physicians. Occurring within a clinic setting, interns incorporate evidence-informed clinical reasoning in applying effective health care procedures and professional integrity in the delivery of patient-centered care. At this point in the clinical internship course series, interns continue to be closely supervised by their attending physician, treating similar cases as in clinical internship II, but the hours engaged in patient care are increased. Completion of the written and practical clinical skills assessment examination occurs concurrently with enrollment in this course.

 

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 10 clinic
Grading: P/F

7313 - Written Clinical Skills Assessment

The two-hour written CSA is designed to assess clinical knowledge and clinical reasoning skills and draws from all Q1-Q8 course work. The written CSA includes multiple-choice, matching, fill-in-the-blank, and short-answer questions categorized into seven topical subsections:  history/differential diagnosis, physical examination, lab, imaging, diagnosis, case management and evidence informed practice (EIP).

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

7314 - Practical Clinical Skills Assessment

The practical CSA is modeled after NBCE Part IV and consists of 16, six-minute, graded stations and draws from all Q1-Q8 course work. Students perform a series of specified procedures including history, examination, and simulated treatment on a trained standardized patient. The student’s performance is observed by a trained evaluator and assessed using detailed grading rubrics. Students must also answer written questions related to the clinical condition exhibited by the patient including necessary diagnostic testing, diagnosis, and case management/recommended treatment.

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 7324 - Clinical Neurology 5 credits 55 hours

This course covers neurological diseases and disorders with a focus on the central nervous system. The presented conditions are differentiated by their history, signs, and symptoms, and x-ray and laboratory findings. Special attention is placed on conditions commonly encountered or amenable to chiropractic care.

Hours: 5 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CHR 7330 - Thoracic Case Management 1 credits 11 hours

This course reviews and refines the integrated manipulative procedures and management of common disorders of the thoracic spine, anterior chest wall and upper extremity. There is also integration of philosophy and principles of the subluxation complex.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CHR 7331 - Thoracic Case Practicum 1 credits 22 hours

This course reviews and refines adjusting skills utilized in the management of thoracic, rib, and other upper extremity disorders. Soft tissue techniques and mobilizations are also reviewed and refined. Case scenarios are presented to discuss management and problem-solving skills.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 7366 - Jurisprudence and Ethics 2 credits 22 hours

This course systematically reviews the legal and ethical considerations that relate to the practice of chiropractic. It provides students with an understanding of basic principles of law and ethical conduct, focusing on the rights, privileges, and obligations of practitioners of the healing arts as well as those of the patient and public. Rules of evidence, licensure laws, civil and criminal malpractice, informed consent, negligence, expert witness testimony, and other legal aspects of chiropractic practice are covered. Guest lecturers present common standards of professional and ethical conduct and moral judgment. Students learn to recognize potential legal risks and how best to avoid litigious pitfalls

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 7367 - Genitourinary Survey 4 credits 44 hours

This course surveys the female and male reproductive and urinary systems focusing on the most common conditions seen in a general practice. GU Survey includes practical experience during three evening lab sessions where students perform gynecological, urological, and proctological examinations on live patient simulators. This course prepares the student for clinical evaluation of normal and abnormal presentations of the genitourinary system, including a basic review of anatomy, reproductive pathophysiology, diagnostic testing, and basic conventional and CAM treatments of genitourinary diseases. Lecture, guest speakers, case studies, class participation, and audiovisual aids prepare the student with pertinent history taking skills, clinical decision making, basic care and management skills as well as appropriate referral recommendations.

 

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 7372 - Clinical Nutrition and Botanicals II 1 credits 11 hours

This course continues to address the role of diet modification and nutritional and botanical supplementation in the management of commonly encountered health disorders. Disorders of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and gynecological systems will be covered.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 7375 - Introduction to Pharmacology 3 credits 33 hours

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of pharmacology and toxicology. Students learn about common adverse side effects and other complications associated with drug use. Chiropractors are allowed to recommend over-the-counter drugs (OTCs) in most states and Canadian provinces. The course covers non-prescriptive drugs used to manage musculoskeletal complaints as well as allergies and gastrointestinal, respiratory, and skin disorders. Assignments expose students to the use of electronic resources for investigating issues of efficacy, safety, and drug interactions.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 7377 - Marketing and Advertising 1 credits 11 hours

This course focuses on how to ethically, professionally and effectively market and position yourself and your practice. The first portion of this class will be focused on marketing yourself – creating a resume, learning how to network and best practices for jobs searching. The second portion of this course will focus on effectively marketing your practice, both internally and externally. Students will explore various forms of advertising including social media, web presence, word of mouth, networking and print advertising. It will also reinforce understanding of the legal requirements and restrictions of advertising in health care.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

RAD 7394 - Bone Pathology III 1.5 credits 22 hours

This is the third in the series of courses covering the clinical application of diagnostic imaging modalities and interpretation (see RAD 7192, RAD 7293, RAD 8199, and RAD 8295). This course covers the radiological manifestations, clinical and laboratory presentations, and management of osteochondroses, skeletal dysplasias, nutritional, metabolic, endocrine, and hematological conditions affecting the skeletal system. Students review special imaging procedures, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scan, discography, and myelography. Cases utilizing these modalities are presented. Appropriate indications and contraindications are reviewed with an emphasis on appropriate imaging decisions.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

Quarter 10

CLI 8159 - Clinical Internship III 8.25 credits 275 hours

The clinical internship course series provides students with increasing opportunities to apply, integrate, and refine the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become confident, competent, and caring primary care chiropractic physicians. Occurring within a clinic setting, interns incorporate evidence-informed clinical reasoning in applying effective health care procedures and professional integrity in the delivery of patient-centered care. In this course, interns engage in patient care five days each week, actively participating in the management of increasingly complex and challenging cases. Interns are also given their first opportunities to engage in patient care at university health centers off campus as well as community clinics that partner with the university. Completion of the radiology clinical skills assessment occurs concurrently with enrollment in this course.

 

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 25 clinic
Grading: P/F

Quarter 10/11

CHR 8127 - Cervical Case Management 1 credits 11 hours

Evaluation and an integrated treatment approach are presented in the treatment of common disorders of the cervical spine, temporomandibular joint, and cranium. Case scenarios are emphasized to assist problem solving and comprehensive management.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 8140 - Cervical Case Practicum 2 credits 22 hours

This course reviews and refines the integrated manipulative procedures used in the treatment of common disorders of the cervical spine, temporomandibular joint, and cranium.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 8165 - Correlative and Differential Diagnosis 4 credits 44 hours

This course reviews a broad variety of diagnostic sciences, covering the more common clinical entities seen by chiropractic physicians, with extra emphasis on non-musculoskeletal complaints. Students refine their skill in clinical reasoning and increase their efficiency in obtaining data from and about patients. They learn to analyze data pragmatically to obtain the most appropriate diagnosis of a patient’s condition. Particular attention is given to techniques for obtaining patient information through the interview process and strategies for clinical decision-making. Students distinguish between relevant and peripheral clinical issues; differentiate key clues from nonspecific findings; distill clinical information from a list of specific problems and create an appropriate diagnosis. Course material is presented in lectures, supplemented with discussions of case histories and role-playing of doctor/patient interactions.

Hours: 4 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSA 8165 - Radiology Clinical Skills Assessment

The radiology CSA consists of 10, five-minute stations during which students are expected to employ critical thinking to demonstrate their knowledge of radiographic anatomy, radiographic technique, and radiographic pathology for described case scenarios. Students are provided limited case information and must answer multiple choice questions about radiographic findings, differential diagnosis, patient management, and radiographic technique. The format of the exam is intended to help prepare students for NBCE Part IV and draws from all Q1-Q9 radiology course work.

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic

CSC 8167 - Minor Surgery/Proctology 2.5 credits 27.5 hours

This course is a systematic review of pertinent pathological conditions as minor surgical presentations and their resolution through minor surgical means and procedures. It provides an opportunity to gain academic and practical insights into minor surgical and proctological presentations and knowledge and practical skills for minor surgical interventions. Students become familiar with the legal limitations of minor surgery and how to identify associated risk factors. Students are instructed in the appropriate use of sterile fields, administration of local anesthetics, closure of traumatic wounds, and elective surgical procedures. They cover the surgical management of lipomas, sebaceous cysts, inclusion cysts, growths, fibromas, lacerations, ingrown nails, and other presentations amenable to surgical intervention. Special attention is given to surgical interventions for various anorectal disorders, such as internal and external hemorrhoids, anal fissures, skin tags, cryptitis, and others.

Hours: 2.5 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 8171 - Chiropractic Business Plans 2 credits 22 hours

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 8173 - Obstetrics 2 credits 22 hours

This course reviews reproductive physiology and introduces the field of obstetrics and working with pregnant patients in the chiropractic setting. It lays a foundation for students who may later choose to pursue in depth study or co-manage pregnant clients in their practice. Lectures, guest speakers, and audiovisual aids familiarize the student with normal pregnancy and birth, variations from normal, and many of the available options for pregnant women/couples. Students will gain knowledge on how to counsel their pregnant or lactating patients regarding optimal nutrition, appropriate exercise programs, spinal care, and general patient well-being at all the stages from pre pregnancy to post partum. Warning indicators of pregnancy, labor, and post partum complications are also addressed.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 8174 - Genitourinary Lab .5 credits 11 hours

This lab course focuses on conducting physical examinations of the chest/breast, genitourinary and anorectal regions. Students will review and palpate normal and abnormal findings of the reproductive, urinary and anorectal systems focusing on the most common conditions seen in a general ambulatory care practice. This course prepares the student for clinical evaluation of normal and abnormal presentations of the genitourinary system, including basic clinical and topographic anatomy, clinical examinations of these areas, normal and abnormal findings and diagnostic testing.

Hours: 0 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 8178 - Minor Surgery Lab Elective .5 credits 11 hours

This is the elective companion lab to CSC 8167 Minor Surgery/Proctology. Successful completion of both lecture and lab are required for chiropractic licensure in the state of Oregon. This hands-on lab provides practical experience in acquiring those skills necessary in minor surgical services. Students practice establishing sterile fields for the surgical instruments, the doctor, and the patient and practice appropriate infiltration techniques associated with the administration of local anesthetics. Appropriate suturing techniques are given special attention.

Hours: 0 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 8181 - Clinically Applied Evidence I 1 credits 11 hours

A one-hour journal club format course designed to practice the application and refinement of evidenced-informed practice (EIP) skills acquired earlier in the program. These skills include accessing clinical research evidence, critical appraisal of relevant primary studies and pre-appraised reviews on diagnosis, treatment, harm (risk), and prognosis. Interpretation and assessment of study results, and application to patient care is integrated with clinical experience and patient preference.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

RAD 8199 - Soft Tissue Interpretation 1.5 credits 22 hours

This is the fourth course in the series covering the clinical application of diagnostic imaging modalities and interpretation (RAD 7192, RAD 7293, RAD 7394, and RAD 8295). This course covers diagnostic imaging of the chest and abdomen. A pattern approach to teaching common cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary conditions is used. The student is taught how to recognize abnormal radiographic patterns and is introduced to preliminary management protocols. Definitive diagnosis is often not possible due to limitations in scope of practice and access to specialized imaging and laboratory procedures. Therefore, the focus of this course is on recognition and preliminary management

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CHR 8226 - Lumbopelvic Case Management 2 credits 22 hours

This course presents an advanced review, expansion and correlation of the clinical features of joint dysfunction/ subluxation syndromes, including causes, biomechanical and neurological effects, and treatment. Chiropractic management of common spinal conditions is reviewed and expanded, with emphasis on case-based problem solving and critical thinking. Current trends in chiropractic practice and managed care are surveyed.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 8231 - Lumbopelvic Case Practicum 1 credits 22 hours

This course refines and integrates diagnosis, manipulation, and general chiropractic management of common disorders of the lumbar spine, pelvis, and extremities. Case scenarios are emphasized to assist diagnosis, comprehensive management, and patient communication.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CHR 8241 - Chiropractic Technique Survey 1 credits 22 hours

Adjustive Technique X consists of a series of selected topics with demonstration of the manipulative procedures used for special problem cases or presentations followed by hands-on workshop.

Hours: 0 lecture - 2 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

CSC 8266 - Clinical Pediatrics 3 credits 33 hours

This course focuses on the normal growth and development of children and the most common issues in their health care. Students become familiar with developmental milestones and learn to identify individuals who are not developing within normal expectations. Particular attention is given to conducting a well child examination, identifying the most common childhood illnesses, and assessing and managing orthopedic conditions. Students learn how to communicate effectively and respectfully with children and how to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms of child abuse and the laws regarding reporting of suspected abuse. Problems that can be managed with conservative chiropractic care and those that require appropriate referral are differentiated.

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 8267 - Clinical Geriatrics 2 credits 22 hours

This course provides an understanding of the unique characteristics of the elderly patient and explores the effects of aging and chronic degenerative processes. Students become familiar with the evaluation and conservative management of geriatric disorders, focusing on the normal physiologic changes associated with aging and normal variants in geriatric physical examination findings. Danger signals associated with lifethreatening disorders are investigated, along with utilization of appropriate decision-making strategies for proper care of the patient. Tests and screening evaluations are investigated to determine those that best identify declining health related functions. Intervention options that restore and maintain the quality of life are discussed. Specific attention is given to nutritional inadequacies, deconditioning, gait and balance disorders, mental dysfunction, hearing and vision impairment, and medication-related problems.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

CSC 8268 - Clinical Psychology 3 credits 33 hours

This course is a survey of clinical psychology as pertinent to chiropractic practice. Students will attain proficiency in subject areas requisite for successful performance on the licensing examination for chiropractic physicians, acquire interpersonal skills as they relate to patient interviewing and gain basic understanding of behavioral principles and their application in various forms of psychotherapy. Instructional time is sectioned into three formats: 1. an interactive, participatory lecture/discussion, 2. learning and practicing clinical skills relevant to interviewing and supporting a patient while screening and detecting likely psychopathology, and 3. case presentations and discussion relevant to the day’s topics. Students will identify and discuss (without compromising confidentiality) at least 2 patients that have shown some evidence of psychopathology or behavioral problems.

 

Hours: 3 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 8272 - Billing, Coding and Documentation 2 credits 22 hours

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to bill patients and third party payers for services performed utilizing ethical, legal and efficient strategies. Students learn billing codes and procedural requirements underpinning use of those codes. Students demonstrate ability to appropriately apply various coding modifiers and demonstrate ability to justify coding and billing through appropriate health record for all billing codes. They will also develop skills at performing billing and coding for a variety of chiropractic and primary care services that are within the scope of chiropractic in Oregon.

Hours: 2 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: G

CSC 8281 - Clinically Applied Evidence II 1 credits 11 hours

A one-hour journal club format course designed to practice the application and refinement of evidenced-informed practice (EIP) skills acquired earlier in the program. These skills include accessing clinical research evidence, critical appraisal of relevant primary studies and pre-appraised reviews on diagnosis, treatment, harm (risk), and prognosis. Interpretation and assessment of study results, and application to patient care is integrated with clinical experience and patient preference.

Hours: 1 lecture - 0 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: P/F

RAD 8295 - Bone Pathology IV 1.5 credits 22 hours

This is the last in a series of five courses covering the clinical application of diagnostic imaging modalities and interpretation (see RAD 7192, RAD 7293, RAD 7394, and RAD 8199). Diagnostic radiology is an integral part of chiropractic practice. This course provides the student with a review of all topics previously covered in the radiology courses. A review of the minimal diagnostic series and supplemental radiographic views are included for each area of the body. This review course near the end of the formal chiropractic education better prepares students for the realities of practice.

Hours: 1 lecture - 1 lab - 0 clinic
Grading: g

Quarter 11

CLI 8262 - Clinical Internship IV 8.25 credits 275 hours

The clinical internship course series provides students with increasing opportunities to apply, integrate, and refine the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become confident, competent, and caring primary care chiropractic physicians. Occurring within a clinic setting, interns incorporate evidence-informed clinical reasoning in applying effective health care procedures and professional integrity in the delivery of patient-centered care. Interns continue to gain autonomy yet remain under the mentorship and guidance of supervising attending physicians. Interns become increasingly responsible for the management of complex and challenging cases and conditions.

 

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 25 clinic
Grading: P/F

Quarter 12

CLI 8362 - Clinical Internship V 9 credits 297 hours

The clinical internship course series provides students with increasing opportunities to apply, integrate, and refine the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to become confident, competent, and caring primary care chiropractic physicians. Occurring within a clinic setting, interns incorporate evidence-informed clinical reasoning in applying effective health care procedures and professional integrity in the delivery of patient-centered care. Interns continue to provide patient care in this final clinical internship course. Most interns have the opportunity to participate in the university preceptorship program, completing their clinical education in a private practice setting. Upon successful completion of this course, interns will have demonstrated the competencies necessary for unsupervised chiropractic practice.

 

Hours: 0 lecture - 0 lab - 27 clinic
Grading: P/F